Friday, June 22, 2018

Walking in Fellowship with the Father

Walking in Fellowship with the Father
Ephesians 5:1,2,8,15,16 

Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God . . . Walk as children of light.

If we are the children of God, then we ought to fellowship with the Father. We are to walk as children of light, in wisdom and purity. The word “followers” in verse 1 of the King James Bible is the word mimics so that we may say, “Be ye therefore imitators of God, as dear children.”  Paul gave several purposes why we should walk in fellowship with the Father.

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father in love. Walking with God and in fellowship with Him, teaches us to love Him and others as He loves. Without His abundant love abounding in our hearts, we cannot truly love others as we are commanded to do.

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father as children of light. Since we are to imitate the Father, then we should walk in the light having nothing to do with the darkness of sin. It is beneath the dignity of a saint of God to indulge in the sins which Paul names in Ephesians 5:3,4. Walking in fellowship with the Father is walking in the light of the Word of God, “called out of darkness into His marvelous light” (I Peter 2:9).

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father in wisdom. See that you walk carefully, circumspectly, with guidance from the Word of God. The word circumspectly comes from two Latin words which mean, “looking around.” Only a fool drifts with the wind and the tide but a person that walks in the fellowship of the Father walks in the knowledge and understanding of God’s word. 

To fellowship with the Father is to follow Him as imitators of Christ that He may transform our minds through His glorious Truth.


Lord, may I walk wisely in the fellowship of Your marvelous light and love.

Friday, June 15, 2018

I've Sinned, What Now?

I’ve Sinned, What Now?

Psalm 51:3-4  KJV
For I acknowledge my transgressions: and my sin is ever before me. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight. . .”

When David was confronted with his transgressions, he realized that his sin was against God and prayed a prayer of repentance taking full responsibility for what he had done. As a Christian, you will war with Satan in his efforts to undermine you. But, a believer has already been provided a way of escape according to (I Corinthians 10:13)Although your offenses against God may seem as though they will require some desperate measures, you do have hope “through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 7:25; Hebrews 4:15,16). Because of His unchanging, and matchless, character, Christ’s infinite grace has forgiven all your sins.

Some Christians assume that certain sins cannot be forgiven or that they are too far gone to be helped. Such unbelief breeds disobedience and despair. We as Christians need to remember that the teaching of the New Testament is “With God nothing shall be impossible” (Luke 1:37)A faithful God does not expect us to do what we cannot; He supplies the strength we need (Philippians 4:13).  Paul, in essence, was saying, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness” (2 Corinthians 12:9).  “He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might He increases strength. They who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint” (Isaiah 40:29-31).

We can reflect on the reassuring words of Paul, who declares, “. . . in whom we trust that he will yet deliver us;” (2 Corinthians 12:9). “Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.  Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass” (Psalm 37:4,5).


Lord, Your grace is sufficient for me.

Friday, June 8, 2018

Life, When It Hurts

Life, When It Hurts
Galatians 6:2 
Bear one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

What does it mean to fulfill the law of Christ? Most Bible teachers say that the law of Christ is what Jesus stated in Mark 12:28-31, “. . . love the Lord your God with all your heart . . . soul . . . mind and . . . strength.’  . . . ‘love your neighbor as yourself.’  There is no other commandment greater than these.”

Are there things that you wish others knew and could understand when life brings real heart-wrenching pain and your grief overpowers every dream you hold dear?  Sometimes people with good intentions say foolish and harmful things to those suffering. Words can wound an already broken heart to the point of devastation instead of giving hope and strength in an ongoing crisis.

Someone in sorrow needs for you to come alongside and give them encouragement through a touch of compassion, and a tearful, tender heart (Romans 12:15). Even though the question, “How are you doing?” seems like the right thing to ask, it can seem to the wounded and distressed that they need to give a report of their actions, thoughts, or emotions. There’s not a time limit on grieving and people from all walks of life suffer differently. 

Expressing an impatient attitude towards a hurting person is jarring to the senses. It can cause despondency; the loss of hope, and despair; the feeling that no favorable outcome will ever exist.  Be thoughtful in quoting Scripture such as Romans 8:28, most likely, things are not good for them right now, nor does it seem like there will ever be anything positive come out of their circumstances. 

Helping someone who is in deep sorrow to recognize the sovereignty of God in death is what they need most. Knowing that He is in absolute authority over all things brings peace and reminds them to “be still” and rest in the knowledge that God is their Refuge and Comforter, always (Psalms 46:10; 91:1,2; John 14:16).


Lord, may I fulfill the law of Christ, bearing another’s burden.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs

Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs 
1 Corinthians 13:4,5 
Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil;

Throughout the Word of God, accounting terms are used to describe the forgiving work of Christ. When you were saved He did not impute, count, reckon, or consider your sins against you.  “How blessed is the man to whom the LORD does not impute iniquity. . .” (Psalm 32:2).  The pardoning work of God doesn’t credit or assign sin to you. It doesn’t produce long-term resentment but rather, it produces love and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding (Philippians 4:7).

In I Corinthians 13, Paul is showing the model for love. Love doesn’t hold others accountable for wrong deeds or keep any kind of record. It doesn’t recite all the sinful things done because love never makes memories out of offenses. It never rehearses the injustices executed until they’re so embedded that you can’t live your life in freedom. Love is unable to do this.

To think no evil (I Corinthians 13:5 KJV) means we don’t take into account a wrong or evil we have suffered at the hands of someone or hold it against them indefinitely. While suffering on the cross, Jesus spoke these words, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34). Holding no grudges and keeping no record of wrong is what Paul is trying to encourage believers to do.

“. . . Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Christ and. . . God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them” (I Corinthians 5:17-19).  As God has forgiven us and does not count our sins against us, we too, are to forgive and be reconciled to those who have sinned against us.


Lord, thank You for the love that reconciles sinners to God and keeps no record of wrongs.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

What Is True Friendship?

What Is True Friendship?
“A friend loves at all times,” (Proverbs 17:17). Human beings have a deep longing for acceptance and fellowship with fellow human beings. Proverbs 17:17 also states that “a brother is born for adversity.” A true friend is as close as a brother and willing to walk with us through our deepest struggles.

As wonderful as human relationships are, they are never perfect in this world. Our friendships are all too often artificial when we reveal our flaws, (sins), or they divulge theirs to us. Unfortunately, this means that our friendships are often quite insecure, prompting us to look for a friendship that is more certain because it is not based on what the other person finds pleasing in us. The only one who can provide this kind of perfect friendship is Christ. 

To students of American history, one example of the importance of friendship for believers can be found in the diary of Esther Burr, the third of Jonathan and Sarah Edwards’ eight daughters and a Christian housewife living in Colonial New Jersey in the mid-1750s. Esther declared: “Nothing is more refreshing to the soul (except communication with God Himself) than the company and fellowship of a friend.”

Esther earnestly sought to know the presence of God in her life. She came to appreciate the fact that friends are a divine gift. In her diary, she wrote: “Tis… a great mercy himself that we have any friends—What would this world be without them. A person who looks upon himself to be friendless must of all creatures be miserable in this Life.” True friends are those with whom one can share the deepest things of life with. They are people with whom one can be transparent,  open and one can “disclose their whole soul.” 

Christ is the purest example of a friend we can find in the Bible, laying down His life—His extraordinarily valuable life—for the friends, whom he loved. Although he had the power to call those around Him His servants, He called them friends.


Lord, thank You for being my friend.

Friday, May 18, 2018

Have You Lied to Yourself?

Have You Lied to Yourself?
Matthew 7:1-5 KJV
. . .  hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; . . .

It’s not easy coming to terms with your sinfulness. Seeing the beam in your own eye is like coming out of a bad movie and realizing that you were the featured actor/actress. Your part, judging and condemning people. Oh, the pride, in all of its corruption protrudes from the realization that you are guilty of being negative, disapproving and judgmental. You have been blinded to your own sin, yet others could not help but see who you really are. The lie you told yourself is finally played out and the truth emerges. You ultimately see the critical, fault-finding spirit that lives in your heart.

When our well-kept secret is finally uncovered, things begin to crumble.  Because our foundation has been resting upon a rotten core, the support of a previous arrogance and confidence will crack and then collapse. The safe covering we enjoyed behind our sin is gone. The more we convince ourselves that we’re better than most the more painful the revealing becomes. Who we are is now in plain view for all to see and we must be wholly dependent on His grace.

As we arrive at this level of conviction, we can no longer pretend or make-believe. We thought our sin would never come out, but it did. We have been acting like this for years and it has become a practice that seems impossible to stop. We are under some illusion that through mere methods we have the power to change our path from sin to righteousness. True repentance brings our sin to the throne of grace where real mortification takes place. 

Psalm 51:1-10 says in part, Have mercy on me, O God,. . . blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,. . . I know my sin is ever before me. Against you only, have I sinned . . . Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.

Lord, I have sinned against You, I repent!


Friday, May 11, 2018

How Do We Strengthen Our Homes?

How Do We Strengthen Our Homes?

Matthew 18:21-22 
Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times? Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy times seven.

What can we do to strengthen our homes?  Does the Bible have an answer for us? Keep in mind what God calls us to do, He enables and equips us to achieve. What is most important in our families that causes relationships to be sustained for the long haul? The answer, FORGIVENESS. Forgiveness is an act of love that is undeserved and unearned. It affirms to the offender that there is no longer any anger, hatred, or a desire for vengeance necessary. The guilt has been removed and the blame is gone. This is the exact compassion that God demonstrates towards sinners. He grants to us a promise of unconditional love through His precious Gospel. Our reproach and humiliation have been removed and God’s attitude towards those who have put their faith in Him is His unfathomable favor. This is what makes a lasting relationship when there are no resentments or unresolved grievances we harbor.

In Colossians 3:13, Paul says, “Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye.”

Unforgiveness imprisons and keeps people chained to their past. As long as they are unwilling to forgive offenders and their offenses, they are shackled to them, keeping their pain alive like an open sore. Christ is our model of forgiveness and has pardoned all our sins––the most important truth in Scripture (Colossians 2:13). He has canceled out our sin debt against a holy God and redeemed us (fulfilled the necessary payment for sin) with His blood (Colossians 1:14). How can we, who have been forgiven so much, not forgive someone? To make our homes strong, we need to release others through a heart of forgiveness (Ephesians 4:32).


Lord, build my home.  Amen!