Friday, August 10, 2018

Are You Committing Spiritual Adultery?

Are You Committing Spiritual Adultery?

So often, prostitution is referred to as the "oldest profession” in the world. It has always been a common way for women to make money, even in Bible times. God forbids such involvement with a prostitute because He knows this attachment is harmful to both men and women. Satan’s work of seduction begins with its words of deceptive flattery. The lips of honey should be meant for one’s true love in marriage and not for anything outside of this sacred bond. The tasting of the adulterous women’s lips is said to be, “bitter as wormwood” and “as sharp as a two-edged sword,” symbols of suffering and death (Proverbs 5:3-5).

Prostitution not only destroys marriages, families, and lives, but it destroys a person’s physical body and leads to spiritual death. We are to keep our bodies pure to be used as tools for His service and glory (Romans 6:13) The body is not for sexual immorality but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body (I Corinthians 6:13b).

Being in spiritual adultery is dangerous and deadly just as being a prostitute, or being with a prostitute is hazardous and extremely risky. Spiritual adultery is unfaithfulness to God and having an excessive fondness for the things of the world (James 4:4). The one who is an enemy of God is seen throughout Scripture as an unbeliever, one who has a deep and intimate longing for the things of the world and not for God. 

The Bible says if we set our mind on the flesh it is death, but to be spiritually minded is life and peace. The mind that is set on the flesh is hostile and in opposition towards God (Romans 8:5-7). Allow Christ to transform you by the renewing of your mind (Romans 12:2). The love of the world is primarily an attitude of the heart. To avoid spiritual adultery, “Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth” (Colossians 3:2).

Lord, may my heart and mind be fixed on You.


Friday, August 3, 2018

Do You Resolve Conflicts by Yelling?

Do You Resolve Conflicts by Yelling?
Proverbs 15:1 
A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.

Are you a yeller? Do you yell when you’re frustrated with your children, things, or problems? Does it seem like the only time your children fight, have needs or start getting loud is when you’re on the phone? Most of the time, as a mom, you find that you are away from the conflict that has been brewing in another room for a while.  You’re cooking, cleaning, or changing a diaper and the battle over toys, clothes, or you name it begins. You yell out in frustration from wherever you are, “STOP, your yelling or fighting!” You know that yelling doesn’t work either and so you begin to give a long list of ultimatums. I know what you’re thinking. And “No,” that doesn’t work either.

Just like the children in the classroom need the attention and gentle touch of the teacher, so do the children in your home. I realize that it is hard to stop in the middle of what you are doing and go to where your children are quarreling or engaging in hand-to-hand combat, but it is most beneficial if you do. 

Things That Will Help You in Settling Quarrels

    •   Being self-aware of your urge to yell is a starting place 

    •   Calm yourself before entering the war zone

    •   Speak in a low voice and bring the child/children close to you

    •   Realize anger causes an increase in quarreling and bad feelings

    •   Try to be consistent when discipline is needed

    •   Encourage children to forgive each other

    •   Help children solve the problem

These are just a few things that will help you settle quarrels between siblings and friends. Make sure you are getting closer to the problem and not yelling out instructions from another room. Children need to see your face, feel your gentle touch, (not squeezing their shoulder) and hear a soft voice instruct them. 

Lord, give me the wisdom to help instruct my children in settling quarrels and forgiving one another.



Friday, July 27, 2018

What Fills Your Mind?

What Fills Your Mind?
Philippians 4:8 KJV
Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. 

You could consider the above verse to be highly important in your life. Because there are thoughts that occupy your mind and become more critical as time passes, your thoughts will determine the extent of your love for God, and your love for others. Your life, as you know it today, is a result of your process of thinking yesterday. Your life tomorrow will be determined by what you think and do today.

A healthy thought life comes out of a close relationship with Christ: reading His Word, praying and being obedient to what the Bible instructs. This is essential! As a believer, you need to be sure your ideas about God are accurate, biblical, and true. Inaccurate and unbiblical views about God and the gospel of Christ are damaging to your faith.

When we view ourselves through the lens of God’s Word, we can replace the negative, self-defeating thoughts with His truth. We are worthless sinners, and without Christ, we are unquestionably lost in hopelessness and despair.  Remembering what Christ has done for us and what is TRUE according to the gospel is essential. “For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s”  (I Corinthians 6:20). It is in Christ that our heart is guarded and secure.

The capability to think biblically, and live out the gospel message in our lives, comes only through the influence of the Holy Spirit. Don’t waver in your faith being tossed to and fro thinking opposing and unfruitful thoughts. The Apostle Paul taught in Philippians 4:8 that Christians are to reflect on things that are true, honest, just, etc., for in your human weakness God’s grace is still sufficient for all.


Lord, keep my mind stayed on You.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Witnessing with Boldness

Witnessing with Boldness

Acts 14:8-15

Paul and Barnabas are in the city of Lystra giving the gospel. We see Paul’s boldness in his witness for Christ and his humility. There is no mention of a synagogue in the city so most likely, he is preaching to a crowd of people gathered in the marketplace or town square. As Paul begins to speak, he looks upon a man that has been crippled from birth–– “perceiving that he had faith to be healed.” Paul commands the man to stand up and immediately the man leaps up and walks.

When this miracle took place, the men of the city cried out in Lycaonian, “The gods are come down to us in the likeness of men!” According to tradition or folklore, the gods Zeus and Hermes visited Lystra incognito. They asked for food and lodging but everyone turned them away except one old man and his wife. This so displeased the gods that they took vengeance upon the people of the city, drowning them by a great flood. The couple that took them in was spared this plight. Their humble home was made into a temple where they served as a priest and priestess. The people of Lystra believed Barnabas to be Zeus, Jupiter, and Paul to be Hermes, Mercury.

Paul and Barnabas didn’t become proud or desire the praise of men; but cried out to the people, “stop this ritual we are men as you are.” They preached the gospel to them telling them of the Creator of heaven and earth. After restraining the crowd from offering sacrifices for them, some Jews from Antioch and Iconium came to Lystra persuading the crowd to stone Paul. One minute they were desiring to sacrifice oxen for Paul and Barnabas and then were plotting to stone Paul. They dragged him outside of the city, leaving him for dead. Paul survived the stoning and continued to the city of Derbe, to preach the Good News. He believed that proclaiming Christ was his sole purpose for living.


Lord, may I boldly give the gospel of Christ.

Friday, July 13, 2018

Teaching Your Children (Part 2)

Teaching Your Children (Part 2)
Training children is not an easy task, but it is extremely rewarding. We, as parents, are instructed to train up children in the “nurture and admonition of the Lord.” We are to love, discipline, and instruct them in the precepts of the Word of God. We are instructed never to provoke, annoy, or anger our children with unreasonable demands or criticisms. But, we are to bring our children up to respect the ways of God as a foundation of life in godliness, with blessings.
Teach your children to obey –– Proverbs 1:8, “My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law (teaching) of thy mother:” Proverbs 6:20-23, My son, keep thy father's commandment, and forsake not the law (teaching) of thy mother: Bind them continually upon thine heart, and tie them about thy neck.  When thou goest, it shall lead thee; when thou sleepest, it shall keep thee; and when thou awakest, it shall talk with thee. For the commandment is a lamp; and the law (teaching) is light; and reproofs of instruction (discipline) are the way of life:”
It is an unbelievable thing to watch young mothers today trying to get their children to obey. They stroll through the store with a screaming child while they count to numbers that mean absolutely nothing. They attempt to threaten or intimidate their children into obedience but never succeed. The parent continues to ignore the fit that has proceeded throughout the store, and the child has not yet obeyed. Is that a picture of “Teaching your child to obey?” No! Teaching a child to obey takes time and discipline on the part of the mother/parent. Sometimes, it’s the embarrassment that causes a mother to just say, “forget it!” We can’t do that if we want our children to learn the godly aspect of obedience. Teaching a child to obey, mom and dad is important and biblical because it guides a child into the practice of obeying God as they mature and grow older.

Lord, help me to train my children to obey.

Friday, July 6, 2018

Teaching Your Children (Part 1)

Teaching Your Children

Deuteronomy 6:5-8 KJV
And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. . .

The book of Proverbs is a practical guide for mothers and fathers to impart to their children the wisdom of God. There are wonderful lessons for your children that will serve them well their entire lives.

What is a healthy fear of God? Proverbs 9:10, “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding.” There are two kinds of fear mentioned in the Bible. One fear is the fear of the Lord, which is good and to be encouraged. The second kind of fear is a "spirit of fear"  (2 Timothy 1:7), which is a hindrance to one’s faith in God.
What does it mean to fear the Lord? To have a correct view of God with an attitude of respect and awe. This includes His unfailing love, mercy, power, and His glory. The fear of the Lord contains many blessings and benefits one of which is true salvation. Also, this fear leads to wisdom and brings genuine rest and contentment (Proverbs 19:23).  
What does it mean to guard the heart? Children need to be taught to protect their minds. Proverbs 4:23 says, “Keep thy heart with all diligence; for out of it are the issues of life.” To watch over their heart means a parent needs to be a safeguard regarding their minds, their emotions, and their will. The heart is like a depository and parents are to be careful about what their children watch, read, and listen to. Their minds are simple, uncomplicated and somewhat unaffected by the things of this world. That’s why they need guidance through their formative years in the things that enter the eye gate –– impacting the heart.

Lord, I pray for wisdom to be able to guide my children in the fear of the Lord.

Friday, June 29, 2018

Thank You for Freedom


Thank You for Freedom

Galatians 5:1 KJV
 Stand fast therefore in the liberty (freedom) wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage (slavery).

There is no greater feeling of liberation than to experience the freedom from sin and death that You, Father, have provided through Christ Jesus. Today my voice and my heart are free to praise You for this, and I am immensely grateful. Forty-five years ago, I was “Born Again” by the Spirit of God working in my life. This was the first truly free Fourth of July celebration I had ever experienced and I will forever be thankful.

On this Independence Day, I am reminded of all those who have sacrificed for my freedom, following the example of Your Son, Jesus Christ. Let me never take my freedom for granted, physically or spiritually. May I call to mind my freedom was purchased with an immeasurable worth, others’ lives. Thank you, Father, for giving the ultimate sacrifice, Your perfect sinless Son, for a sinner like me.

I want to express my sincere appreciation to my God for allowing me the awesome opportunity of being an American and for the wonderful life Christ has given me. I am free from the bondage of sin according to Galatians 5:1, and privileged to live in the land of the free. Though the men and women that have given their lives for freedom’s sake were not my personal friends, I am thankful for their extreme sacrifice, and love of liberty. The sacrificial death of Christ upon the cross was an expression of Jesus’ love for me and evidence of His selfless mercy and infinite grace He has freely given. 

 ~ Famous Quote ~

On God's side ~ "My concern is not whether God is on our side; my greatest concern is to be on God's side." — Abraham Lincoln


Lord, bless those who continue to give their lives for my freedom and grant me the opportunity to lead others to true freedom that can only be found in knowing You through the Gospel of Christ by faith.

Friday, June 22, 2018

Walking in Fellowship with the Father

Walking in Fellowship with the Father
Ephesians 5:1,2,8,15,16 

Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God . . . Walk as children of light.

If we are the children of God, then we ought to fellowship with the Father. We are to walk as children of light, in wisdom and purity. The word “followers” in verse 1 of the King James Bible is the word mimics so that we may say, “Be ye therefore imitators of God, as dear children.”  Paul gave several purposes why we should walk in fellowship with the Father.

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father in love. Walking with God and in fellowship with Him, teaches us to love Him and others as He loves. Without His abundant love abounding in our hearts, we cannot truly love others as we are commanded to do.

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father as children of light. Since we are to imitate the Father, then we should walk in the light having nothing to do with the darkness of sin. It is beneath the dignity of a saint of God to indulge in the sins which Paul names in Ephesians 5:3,4. Walking in fellowship with the Father is walking in the light of the Word of God, “called out of darkness into His marvelous light” (I Peter 2:9).

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father in wisdom. See that you walk carefully, circumspectly, with guidance from the Word of God. The word circumspectly comes from two Latin words which mean, “looking around.” Only a fool drifts with the wind and the tide but a person that walks in the fellowship of the Father walks in the knowledge and understanding of God’s word. 

To fellowship with the Father is to follow Him as imitators of Christ that He may transform our minds through His glorious Truth.


Lord, may I walk wisely in the fellowship of Your marvelous light and love.

Friday, June 15, 2018

I've Sinned, What Now?

I’ve Sinned, What Now?

Psalm 51:3-4  KJV
For I acknowledge my transgressions: and my sin is ever before me. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight. . .”

When David was confronted with his transgressions, he realized that his sin was against God and prayed a prayer of repentance taking full responsibility for what he had done. As a Christian, you will war with Satan in his efforts to undermine you. But, a believer has already been provided a way of escape according to (I Corinthians 10:13)Although your offenses against God may seem as though they will require some desperate measures, you do have hope “through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 7:25; Hebrews 4:15,16). Because of His unchanging, and matchless, character, Christ’s infinite grace has forgiven all your sins.

Some Christians assume that certain sins cannot be forgiven or that they are too far gone to be helped. Such unbelief breeds disobedience and despair. We as Christians need to remember that the teaching of the New Testament is “With God nothing shall be impossible” (Luke 1:37)A faithful God does not expect us to do what we cannot; He supplies the strength we need (Philippians 4:13).  Paul, in essence, was saying, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness” (2 Corinthians 12:9).  “He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might He increases strength. They who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint” (Isaiah 40:29-31).

We can reflect on the reassuring words of Paul, who declares, “. . . in whom we trust that he will yet deliver us;” (2 Corinthians 12:9). “Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.  Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass” (Psalm 37:4,5).


Lord, Your grace is sufficient for me.

Friday, June 8, 2018

Life, When It Hurts

Life, When It Hurts
Galatians 6:2 
Bear one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

What does it mean to fulfill the law of Christ? Most Bible teachers say that the law of Christ is what Jesus stated in Mark 12:28-31, “. . . love the Lord your God with all your heart . . . soul . . . mind and . . . strength.’  . . . ‘love your neighbor as yourself.’  There is no other commandment greater than these.”

Are there things that you wish others knew and could understand when life brings real heart-wrenching pain and your grief overpowers every dream you hold dear?  Sometimes people with good intentions say foolish and harmful things to those suffering. Words can wound an already broken heart to the point of devastation instead of giving hope and strength in an ongoing crisis.

Someone in sorrow needs for you to come alongside and give them encouragement through a touch of compassion, and a tearful, tender heart (Romans 12:15). Even though the question, “How are you doing?” seems like the right thing to ask, it can seem to the wounded and distressed that they need to give a report of their actions, thoughts, or emotions. There’s not a time limit on grieving and people from all walks of life suffer differently. 

Expressing an impatient attitude towards a hurting person is jarring to the senses. It can cause despondency; the loss of hope, and despair; the feeling that no favorable outcome will ever exist.  Be thoughtful in quoting Scripture such as Romans 8:28, most likely, things are not good for them right now, nor does it seem like there will ever be anything positive come out of their circumstances. 

Helping someone who is in deep sorrow to recognize the sovereignty of God in death is what they need most. Knowing that He is in absolute authority over all things brings peace and reminds them to “be still” and rest in the knowledge that God is their Refuge and Comforter, always (Psalms 46:10; 91:1,2; John 14:16).


Lord, may I fulfill the law of Christ, bearing another’s burden.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs

Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs 
1 Corinthians 13:4,5 
Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil;

Throughout the Word of God, accounting terms are used to describe the forgiving work of Christ. When you were saved He did not impute, count, reckon, or consider your sins against you.  “How blessed is the man to whom the LORD does not impute iniquity. . .” (Psalm 32:2).  The pardoning work of God doesn’t credit or assign sin to you. It doesn’t produce long-term resentment but rather, it produces love and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding (Philippians 4:7).

In I Corinthians 13, Paul is showing the model for love. Love doesn’t hold others accountable for wrong deeds or keep any kind of record. It doesn’t recite all the sinful things done because love never makes memories out of offenses. It never rehearses the injustices executed until they’re so embedded that you can’t live your life in freedom. Love is unable to do this.

To think no evil (I Corinthians 13:5 KJV) means we don’t take into account a wrong or evil we have suffered at the hands of someone or hold it against them indefinitely. While suffering on the cross, Jesus spoke these words, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34). Holding no grudges and keeping no record of wrong is what Paul is trying to encourage believers to do.

“. . . Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Christ and. . . God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them” (I Corinthians 5:17-19).  As God has forgiven us and does not count our sins against us, we too, are to forgive and be reconciled to those who have sinned against us.


Lord, thank You for the love that reconciles sinners to God and keeps no record of wrongs.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

What Is True Friendship?

What Is True Friendship?
“A friend loves at all times,” (Proverbs 17:17). Human beings have a deep longing for acceptance and fellowship with fellow human beings. Proverbs 17:17 also states that “a brother is born for adversity.” A true friend is as close as a brother and willing to walk with us through our deepest struggles.

As wonderful as human relationships are, they are never perfect in this world. Our friendships are all too often artificial when we reveal our flaws, (sins), or they divulge theirs to us. Unfortunately, this means that our friendships are often quite insecure, prompting us to look for a friendship that is more certain because it is not based on what the other person finds pleasing in us. The only one who can provide this kind of perfect friendship is Christ. 

To students of American history, one example of the importance of friendship for believers can be found in the diary of Esther Burr, the third of Jonathan and Sarah Edwards’ eight daughters and a Christian housewife living in Colonial New Jersey in the mid-1750s. Esther declared: “Nothing is more refreshing to the soul (except communication with God Himself) than the company and fellowship of a friend.”

Esther earnestly sought to know the presence of God in her life. She came to appreciate the fact that friends are a divine gift. In her diary, she wrote: “Tis… a great mercy himself that we have any friends—What would this world be without them. A person who looks upon himself to be friendless must of all creatures be miserable in this Life.” True friends are those with whom one can share the deepest things of life with. They are people with whom one can be transparent,  open and one can “disclose their whole soul.” 

Christ is the purest example of a friend we can find in the Bible, laying down His life—His extraordinarily valuable life—for the friends, whom he loved. Although he had the power to call those around Him His servants, He called them friends.


Lord, thank You for being my friend.

Friday, May 18, 2018

Have You Lied to Yourself?

Have You Lied to Yourself?
Matthew 7:1-5 KJV
. . .  hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; . . .

It’s not easy coming to terms with your sinfulness. Seeing the beam in your own eye is like coming out of a bad movie and realizing that you were the featured actor/actress. Your part, judging and condemning people. Oh, the pride, in all of its corruption protrudes from the realization that you are guilty of being negative, disapproving and judgmental. You have been blinded to your own sin, yet others could not help but see who you really are. The lie you told yourself is finally played out and the truth emerges. You ultimately see the critical, fault-finding spirit that lives in your heart.

When our well-kept secret is finally uncovered, things begin to crumble.  Because our foundation has been resting upon a rotten core, the support of a previous arrogance and confidence will crack and then collapse. The safe covering we enjoyed behind our sin is gone. The more we convince ourselves that we’re better than most the more painful the revealing becomes. Who we are is now in plain view for all to see and we must be wholly dependent on His grace.

As we arrive at this level of conviction, we can no longer pretend or make-believe. We thought our sin would never come out, but it did. We have been acting like this for years and it has become a practice that seems impossible to stop. We are under some illusion that through mere methods we have the power to change our path from sin to righteousness. True repentance brings our sin to the throne of grace where real mortification takes place. 

Psalm 51:1-10 says in part, Have mercy on me, O God,. . . blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,. . . I know my sin is ever before me. Against you only, have I sinned . . . Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.

Lord, I have sinned against You, I repent!


Friday, May 11, 2018

How Do We Strengthen Our Homes?

How Do We Strengthen Our Homes?

Matthew 18:21-22 
Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times? Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy times seven.

What can we do to strengthen our homes?  Does the Bible have an answer for us? Keep in mind what God calls us to do, He enables and equips us to achieve. What is most important in our families that causes relationships to be sustained for the long haul? The answer, FORGIVENESS. Forgiveness is an act of love that is undeserved and unearned. It affirms to the offender that there is no longer any anger, hatred, or a desire for vengeance necessary. The guilt has been removed and the blame is gone. This is the exact compassion that God demonstrates towards sinners. He grants to us a promise of unconditional love through His precious Gospel. Our reproach and humiliation have been removed and God’s attitude towards those who have put their faith in Him is His unfathomable favor. This is what makes a lasting relationship when there are no resentments or unresolved grievances we harbor.

In Colossians 3:13, Paul says, “Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye.”

Unforgiveness imprisons and keeps people chained to their past. As long as they are unwilling to forgive offenders and their offenses, they are shackled to them, keeping their pain alive like an open sore. Christ is our model of forgiveness and has pardoned all our sins––the most important truth in Scripture (Colossians 2:13). He has canceled out our sin debt against a holy God and redeemed us (fulfilled the necessary payment for sin) with His blood (Colossians 1:14). How can we, who have been forgiven so much, not forgive someone? To make our homes strong, we need to release others through a heart of forgiveness (Ephesians 4:32).


Lord, build my home.  Amen!

Friday, May 4, 2018

Why Do We Suffer?

Why Do We Suffer?
Job 1:1 KJV 
"In the land of Uz there lived a man whose name was Job. This man was blameless and upright; he feared God and shunned evil."

In the opening of the book of Job, a scene is described in heaven where Job is accused of serving God because God protects him. Satan is seeking God’s consent to test Job and is given permission to try him in his faith, within certain boundaries. The question, “Why do the righteous suffer?” was asked after Job lost all of his wealth, his family, and his health. The three, so-called friends of Job, came to “comfort” him but, instead, began to criticize him about his adversity. They repeatedly said that the suffering in his life was punishment for sin.

Nothing can be done to us by Satan unless God has given permission for him to do so.  God has power over Satan and we will never truly understand the “whys” of pain and suffering brought on by him. We must also realize that not all suffering is because of sin, or the way one lives, but because God wants to test, teach, or purify our lives through some kind of adversity. Scripture teaches us that God’s grace is enough and will sustain us with strength in our weakness through any trial (2 Corinthians 12:9). He desires to produce in us and deserves from us our love, praise, and thanksgiving in every trying circumstance (I Thessalonians 5:18).

Job makes one realize that there are situations going on in our lives that we usually know nothing about. God will allow things to capture our attention, but we commonly respond by questioning God’s goodness without seeing the full picture. Job reminds us to trust God under all circumstances especially when we do not understand what’s happening. “As for God, His way is perfect” (Psalm 18:30). Because God’s ways are “perfect,” we can trust whatever He does—and whatever He allows—to also be perfect. 


Lord, may I rely on Your grace and trust You through each trial.

Friday, April 27, 2018

So, Is There Fruit?

So, Is There Fruit?
John 15:1-2 
I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman. Every branch in me that beareth not fruit he taketh away: and every branch that beareth fruit, he purgeth it, that it may bring forth more fruit.

In John chapter thirteen, Jesus and His disciples celebrated the Passover and Christ announces, “One of you will betray me.”  In chapter fifteen, Jesus is teaching His disciples through imagery what the vine and the branches represent. In the Old Testament, the vine is commonly used as a symbol for Israel but in the New Testament, the Vine or the “True Vine” is specifically identified as Jesus Himself. In this metaphor of the vine and the branches, there are two types of branches: 1. (branches that bear fruit) and 2. (branches that do not bear fruit). With this vine, Jesus illustrates the fundamental secret of the Christian life, "Abide in Me, and I in you" (John 15:4). 

Could there be a good tree with no good fruit? No! Would every Christian have good fruit? Yes!  Every good tree brings forth good fruit, and every corrupt tree brings forth evil fruit. A good tree can't bring forth bad fruit; neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. The true Christian cannot continually bear evil fruit. There must be the good fruit that comes from the life of God in him (Matthew 7:17-19).

Are you a fruit-bearing Christian or are you one who is bearing no fruit at all? Are you playing church, professing to be a Christian, but have never possessed the good seed of the Gospel? Beware my friend–––professing is claiming or pretending to attempt to make something that is not the case appear true. Possession is belonging to, being completely under the influence of, and being controlled by and empowered through the Holy Spirit of God. Are you professing to be a Christian or are you possessing Christ?

Lord, I know I belong to You completely and that I am abiding in the “True Vine.”

Friday, April 20, 2018

Free Indeed

Free Indeed
John 8:32,36 KJV
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed

Harriet Tubman was a black slave during the 1800’s. As a young girl, she was beaten and whipped by her various masters. She suffered a traumatic head wound when a slave owner threw a heavy metal weight intended for another slave. The damage to her head caused dizziness and pain throughout her lifetime.

After the Master of the plantation died, she heard a rumor that she was going to be sold the next day. Late that night Harriet slipped out into the darkness and began to run. Her father had told her, “If there’s no moon shining, feel for the moss on the trees, moss always grows on the north side.” Harriet made her way to the state of Pennsylvania where she was, “free.” Harriet was helped by the “Underground Railroad” which was not a railroad at all but a chain of people wanting to help those in slavery to be set free. 

Harriet made 19 trips back into dangerous situations to help free over 300 people from slavery. During this very difficult time in her life and in the lives of her family, a $40,000 reward was posted for her capture. She knew God was in charge and she continued to help all those she could until she died at the age of 93. In these many years of turmoil in her life, she was called, “Lady Moses” because of all the people she led out of slavery.

Being enslaved to another human is unthinkable but being a slave to your own sin is damning. Life without Christ is meaningless and ends in eternal death. Jesus has come to set the captives free and in Him, you are free indeed. If you don’t know Christ as your personal Savior, I pray you will put your faith in Him, the One who makes you free. 



Lord, thank You for the truth that makes me free.

The first battle of the Civil War began on April 12, 1861, at Fort Sumter. Harriet Tubman was freeing slaves long before the start of the Civil War and was noted in saying that there were two things that sustained her during this time: the pistol at her side and her faith in God.