Friday, December 14, 2018

Why Hate Sin?

Why Hate Sin?
Ephesians 2:1-10

Have you ever stop to think why you hate sin? Is it because of what sin does to you after it has had its way with you? Are you attempting to remove sin or the repulsive effects of it? What do you think would happen if there were absolutely NO negative consequences to your sin? Have you passionately gripped the fantasy that joy in Christ is only found when sin is absent? 

Christians do not hold this abhorrence for sin’s destruction alone. Social justice is an attempt to reduce sin’s grip on humanity. Societies for thousands of years have taken extreme measures to reduce the full expression of sin. If you were offered a city that had a zero crime rate, the best vegetation, a clean water supply, and the most advanced medical services, would you turn it down? No!

The absence of sin is the reality of heaven. No pain, no sorrow, no tears, and the recreation of the perfect world. That means no negative aftermath of sin. This is often the way the world envisions life after death. They want all the benefits of heaven but refuse to acknowledge the Master who lives there. 

What you don’t realize is that you have been seduced into believing the same concept. Your disgust for sin is not because it distorts the beauty of Christ, but because it brings you discomfort. You are fully trapped in the cycle of self-worship and motivated by anything or anyone other than Jesus Christ. Sin's pleasure appears to be more fulfilling than the person of Christ. 

The Apostle Paul said, “I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord” (Philippians 3:8). Nothing can bring lasting fulfillment except Christ. The key that changes one’s life is the shift from pursuing freedom from the consequences of sin, to enjoying and loving the person of Jesus Christ. Sin is the only thing which God hates and yet He bore our sins for us (I Peter 2:24).


Lord, thank You for loving me.

Friday, December 7, 2018

Without Faith


Without Faith ~ John 8:12-59
Jesus is teaching in the temple during the time of the Feast of the Tabernacles (Booths) and begins to speak of Himself in saying, “I Am the Light of the World.” He is claiming to be the “I AM” from Exodus 3:13-15. Levitical law says to pick up a stone and kill Him (Leviticus 24”10-16). Jesus is connecting Himself to God the Father and tells them, “Whoever follows me will not live in darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12).

For most people, the Bible has become only an instructional Manuel but we need more than instructions or an example to follow. We need someone who will rescue us from our prison of sin because we are unable to free ourselves from that sin debt. Luke 19:10 says, “For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”

John’s focus is on faith and spiritual slavery. Whoever practices sin is in slavery to sin, the sin of unbelief. “And without faith it is impossible to please him, for whoever would draw near to God must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who seek him”(Hebrews 11:6). “I told you that you would die in your sins, for unless you believe that I am he you will die in your sins” (John 8:24). Once one puts their faith in Jesus Christ all of sins power is broken. 

Jesus accuses the Pharisees of being children of the devil (John 8:42-47).  He tells them that the reason why they don’t hear what He is saying is because they are not of God. The Pharisees could not bring themselves to faith. Believing the lies of Satan blinds us to the truth of the Gospel (Ephesians 2:1-3). To obey the words of Christ in John 8 is to put one’s faith in Christ.  Our hope in salvation does not rest in our faithfulness but in His faithfulness alone. We are saved because Jesus saves us.


Lord, thank You for faith.

Friday, November 30, 2018

Someone We Treasure

Someone We Treasure
Mark 12:29-31 
‘… And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’  The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.’”

Figurative definition: anything or anyone we value, love, cherish, prized, or have a deep affection for. 

Someone we treasure we treat with loving kindness holding them in the highest regard.  We show great respect to those we cherish and exhibit compassion. “She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue” (Proverbs 31:26). We are careful not to let anger overtake us, but keep our hearts with all diligence in accordance with the Word of God. “Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you” (Ephesians 4:31-32). 

We share the Gospel with those we hold dear and teach them about Christ and His great mercy towards us. With an unconditional love, that only our Lord can give, we show deep affection to those we highly value. “For this is the message that you have heard from the beginning, that we should love one another” (I John 3:11). Someone we treasure we remember them in their special moments, and their changing seasons of life. 

Someone we love we encourage by exalting the Savior, “Oh, magnify the LORD with me, and let us exalt his name together!” (Psalm 34:3). By expounding the Scriptures, “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness,” (2 Timothy 3:16). And, edifying those that are of the household of faith “So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith” (Galatians 6:10).

Lord, thank You for Christ, our treasure.



Friday, November 23, 2018

A Powerful God!

A Powerful God!

Acts 12:1-12
During the reign of King Herod, and the days of Unleavened Bread, the king began to take some people prisoner who belonged to the church. He had James the brother of John killed by the sword and apprehended Peter putting him into prison. There were four quaternions of soldiers guarding him with two chains attached to two soldiers for the highest security with two guards at the door. Why so many soldiers for just one man? Herod must have been fearful of the God Peter served.

King Herod’s intentions were to bring Peter out of prison after the Passover to let the people observe his execution. But, during the night, while Peter was sleeping between two guards, an angel of the Lord came unto him. Suddenly, there was a light in the prison cell, and the angel struck Peter on the side waking him and saying to him, “Get up quickly!” Peter’s chains fell off, and the angel said to him, “Dress yourself and put your sandals on.” They passed two guards without notice and proceeded through to the iron gate which opened on its own accord. Amazing!

Peter went directly to Mary’s house, a distinguished Christian woman from the city of Jerusalem. Mary, the mother of John Mark was known for her great faith and courage during times of persecution. After Peter’s arrest, Mary held a prayer meeting in her home which must have been an enormous place to hold such a large assembly of people.

When Peter knocked at the door of the gateway to Mary’s home, a young servant girl named Rhoda came to the door. She recognized Peter’s voice and in her excitement, left Peter standing outside the gate. Rhoda ran back into the house to tell all the people that Peter was at the door. They said, “You’re out of your mind” as Peter continued to knock. Finally, they opened the door, discovering Peter was there. In shock and amazement, they realized that God had miraculously and providentially answered their prayers. What a powerful God!


Lord, thank You for prayer.

Friday, November 16, 2018

Thanksgiving

~Thanksgiving ~
I Thessalonians 5:18 KJV
In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you.

Well, Thanksgiving Day is almost here! Will our gratitude last beyond the afternoon nap? Is Thanksgiving—a one-time, get-it-out-of-the-way holiday that forces us to reflect on how blessed we are? Too quickly, people resort back to being ingrates and complaining about what they don’t have. God’s will for us is to be thankful for all things.  Believers, by faith, need to trust His design and sovereign will for them.

“In every thing” carries an unlimited stipulation. It refers to everything that may take place in one’s life, except, of course, personal sin. No matter what struggles or trials God will directly or indirectly allow in our lives, there is always a reason for thanking Him. I Peter 1:6-9 tells us that we are to rejoice when we have been grieved by various trials. These trials test the genuineness of our faith which is more precious than gold and results in praise, glory, and honor to our Lord Jesus Christ. Even though we don’t see Him now, we do believe in Him and we will have a joy that is inexpressible because the outcome of our faith is the salvation of our souls.

Gratitude should come naturally to believers for all that He has done for us. But, because of our hardness of heart, God encourages us to be thankful with commands that are essential and necessary. “Be careful (anxious) for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God” (Philippians 4:6). Joni Eareckson Tada, who was involved in an accident that left her paralyzed from the neck down, writes, “Giving thanks is not a matter of feeling thankful, it's a matter of obedience.” God wills our being thankful in all things because thankfulness is the ultimate expression of love. May you be filled with thankfulness for all Christ has done.


Lord, thank You for giving me the gift of eternal life.

Friday, November 9, 2018

A Royal Banquet

A Royal Banquet
Esther 1:1-9 

Now it came to pass in the days of Ahasuerus, (this is Ahasuerus which reigned, from India even unto Ethiopia, over an hundred and seven and twenty provinces:)  That in those days, when the king Ahasuerus sat on the throne of his kingdom, which was in Shushan the palace, . . .

Esther lived during the Persian period of world history. The palace in Susa was the winter residence of the king of Persia which was a fortified palace built above the city for protection. In the third year of his reign, King Ahasuerus gave a magnificent banquet inviting his princes, army officers, and nobles of the provinces surrounding him. The main theme of this banquet was to display the great riches and glory of his majesty and splendor to all his guests. 

The Persian King is referenced to 175 times or more in the book of Esther but the name of God, the mention of God or any prayer worshiping Him is never stated. We know that God’s sovereignty prevailed in saving the Jews and if He desired to be mentioned in the writing of this book, He could have moved the author to do so. Though God is not mentioned in the book of Esther, His hand is seen in the saving of the Jews. God’s character and attributes are revealed in His eternal purpose and plan for Israel whether His name is ever written down. May we never forget that God, through the merits of His reputation and character, moves in His providential care for the eternal benefit of His people. 

We have read that great riches were to be displayed in Shushan the palace in the presence of the people as an attempt to bring glory and majesty to King Ahasuerus. But we know, that there is only one King that deserves such glory and majesty. Only one King worthy of praise and worship, only one King entitled to honor, reverence, and exaltation. He is the KING, LORD GOD ALMIGHTY.


Lord, I worship You, as the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

Friday, November 2, 2018

The Exodus and the Gospels

Exodus and the Gospels


Exodus 1-40

Scripture from the book of Exodus is mentioned by Jesus in the Gospels with reference to the burning bush and in the explanation of the resurrection (Exodus 3:6; Matthew 22:29-32; Mark 12:26; and Luke 20:37). When telling the rich young ruler how to enter the kingdom of God, Christ recalls the Ten Commandments quoting Exodus 20:12-16 in Matthew 19:18-19; Mark 10:19; and Luke 18:20. Jesus was clarifying that in keeping the Law perfectly one could enter the kingdom of heaven, but as we understood scripture, it is impossible to do that.

Some of the clearest engagements of the book of Exodus are found in (John 1:1–18) and the feeding of the 5,000 (John 6). Jesus interprets that the feeding of the 5,000 is likened to the manna which Moses gave their ancestors in the wilderness (John 6:31). Manna is described to be “bread from heaven” and in the Gospel of John, Jesus himself says, “I am the bread of life...” (John 6:35) the bread coming down from heaven.

How is the story of the exodus linked to the Gospels? In the Synoptic Gospels as well as in the book of John, the Exodus narrative takes on a significant role. This role does not take away from the importance of the Exodus but is used to magnify Jesus’ as the greater Moses. The Gospels make one point extremely clear that following Jesus leads to an extraordinary salvation and it is more than what the Israelites experienced in fleeing Egyptian rule. We are unable to defeat the enemy, Satan, or conquer sin altogether. Only God can do this for us.

The Exodus Passover lamb is a foreshadowing of Christ. The prophet John the Baptist called Jesus, “the Lamb of God” (John 1:29) and (Exodus 12:5) distinctly calls for a lamb without blemish. Through His sinless life and sacrificial death, Jesus is the only One capable of giving hope of eternal life. 


Lord, thank You for Your sacrifice.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Why Did Jesus Walk on the Water?

Why Did Jesus Walk on the Water?

John 6:16-21
Introduction: The Israelites are living in the promise land but are suppressed under Roman Law. It is the time of their great celebration, the Passover, and Jesus fed over five thousand people. They are at the point of wanting to take Jesus by force to make Him king. But, because it was not His time to be made King, He withdrew to the mountain to be alone. He is not the King of this world but of the kingdom that is to come.

The children of Israel were freed from the bondage of Egypt through Moses and now are desiring to be freed again from Roman rule. Moses is seen as a unique and marvelous picture of Jesus in many ways. In his final speeches to the Israelite people, he gives a Messianic prophecy saying to them: “The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you, from your fellow Israelites. You must listen to him” (Deuteronomy 18:15).

John 6:16 says that when evening came, the disciples went down to the sea, to cross over to Capernaum. The waves were rough and rowing became extremely difficult. After rowing three or four miles out into the sea, Mark 6:49 says that they were frightened thinking they were seeing a ghost. Jesus said, “It is I; do not be afraid” and they immediately helped Him into the boat and were at the shore.  Interesting! When Moses led the Children of Israel out of Egypt to the Red Sea, they, too, were afraid. Moses said to them, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will work for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall never see again” (Exodus 14:13).

Why specifically did Jesus walk on the water? John wanted the reader to see that Jesus is God, the promised Messiah, the One who would fulfill the prophecy of the coming King of glory.


Lord, all praise to You, the King eternal.

Friday, October 19, 2018

More Than Bread and Fish

More Than Bread and Fish
John 6:1-21

The historical setting of John Chapter 6 is during the time of the Passover. The Passover is the remembrance and celebration of the deliverance of the Jews from the bondage of slavery under Egyptian rule through Moses (Exodus 12).

This is a crucial time in the lives of the Jews and John wants the reader to understand the atmosphere and mood of the people. The crowds are huge during this time and much excitement fills the air. It would be somewhat like our 4th of July celebration with fireworks, flag waving, picnics, and patriotic music. The Israelites, being under Roman Law, are again waiting for deliverance through the One prophesied to come.

An important passage to note is John 5:46 where Jesus says, “For if you believed Moses, you would believe me; for he wrote of me.” John is trying to link Moses and Jesus together as the story of John 6 unfolds. The Jews knew the story of Moses and the exodus of their forefathers from Egypt. Jesus, being God, knew that Moses was their hero whom they looked to for hope. Because Jesus is proclaiming Himself to be equal with God, some are seeking to kill Him. He retreats to the other side of the Sea of Galilee where a large crowd follows Him for they have seen the miracles He was doing on the sick (6:2).

The crowd has gathered and the account of the feeding of the five thousand takes place. John’s purpose for giving this information was because of the miracles, or signs that were being carried out. What do signs do? They point us to something specific and in this narrative, they are pointing to Jesus Himself as Prophet, Priest, and King. This connects Moses, the Old Testament prophet, and the word picture of the coming Messiah, Jesus, together. Jesus is not coming to deliver them from Roman rule but to deliver them from the bondage of sin and for the Kingdom to come.


Lord, thank You for the miracle of Redemption.

Friday, October 12, 2018

Moses, an Old Testament Picture of Jesus

Moses, an Old Testament Picture of Jesus
Deuteronomy 18:15 
The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you, from your brothers—it is to him you shall listen.

There are a number of ways in which Moses was an Old Testament picture of Jesus. Moses, with great power, led the children of Israel out of Egypt and out of physical bondage. Moses stood before Pharaoh and said, “Let my people go” (Exodus 5:21). Jesus, with greater power, leads people out of spiritual oppression and slavery to sin.  Jesus came “to proclaim liberty to the captives. . . to set the oppressed free” (Luke 4:18).

Several of the miracles of Moses is like Jesus’ miracles, most notably, the provision of bread in the wilderness which was called, Manna (Exodus 16:32-35). This miracle is comparable to Jesus’ feeding of the 5,000 (John 6:1-13). “When the people saw the sign that he had done, they said, ‘This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world!’” (John 6:14).

Moses was like Jesus in that he would intercede for his people. Exodus 32:11-13, 30-32 tells us that when the Israelites sinned, Moses was ready to plead to God and ask for forgiveness for their sins. Moses’ intercession was only temporary. Our Lord’s intercession is everlasting. “. . . But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous” (I John 2:1). Jesus is now “at the right hand of God,...interceding for us” (Romans 8:34).  Jesus “always lives to make intercession for them” (Hebrews 7:25).

Moses was like Jesus in that he held intimate conversations with God.  “Thus the Lord used to speak to Moses face to face, as a man speaks to his friend” (Exodus 33:11). Jesus had a relationship with the Father which was beyond compare. Matthew 11:27 says, “No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son.”

Lord, thank You for the Messianic Prophecy of Jesus through Moses.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Where is Thy God?

Where is Thy God?
Despondency and Depression are Tumultuous Emotions

Psalm 42:1-3 KJV

As the hart (deer) panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?  My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God?  

There is a conflict that runs between our faith (spiritual realities) and sight (our human emotions). As we read Psalm 42, notice the psalmist struggling with some depression and the feelings of isolation from God. These emotions may have come from an absence of fellowship or discouragement from other believers, or by relentless unbelievers. Whatever the cause, these sentiments are real and recorded for our benefit. 

Some have assigned David to this psalm with his heart longing for the worship he knew in Jerusalem. He has left his home, the throne on which he ruled and now is fleeing from his son, Absalom, in great despair. Eating nothing because of his extreme grief and the bitter words expressed, his heart is overwhelmed. The Psalmist feels it is important to be honest with God about his doubts and struggles with a heavy outpouring from his heart. The writer is responding to the oceans of trials in which he seems to be drowning in and alleges that God is ultimately responsible for each turmoil.

Have you wrestled with the emotions expressed in this psalm? Has your soul been “cast down,” within you? Are you facing challenges at this time and want to rely on God to work in your life? Psalm 42 reveals the character of God and ways He will help you to “walk by faith,” when you are downcast, in despair and depressed. Remind yourself, “Hope in God, He is your help!” Give thanks to God for His saving power and His mighty hand working in and through your life. He is the Lord God of all Truth (Psalm 43:11). You can trust Him.

Lord, thank You for Your presences in my life.

Friday, September 28, 2018

Our Highest Focus

Our Highest Focus

                                                     Ecclesiastes 12:13 


“. . . Fear God and keep his commandments, because this applies to every person.”

Is there true satisfaction in the things of this world? Are some of man’s greatest and most notable achievements only efforts ending in emptiness and pride? It has been incredible what man has accomplished, yet God is rarely given the acknowledgment due to His name. The theme and purpose of the book of Ecclesiastes are revealed through the reflections and experiences of just one man, King Solomon. He was the wisest man that ever lived and declared he had seen everything “under the sun” (Ecclesiastes 1:14).  In his conclusion to the whole matter, Solomon determined that man’s existence was filled with futility and hopelessness. All that he had sought after in life, and in his pursuit of the real meaning of human life was meaningless.

The apostle Paul wrote about all he had accomplished religiously before he was confronted by Christ on the road to Damascus (Philippians 3:4-6). His conclusion, “For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ” (Philippians 3:8). Paul’s greatest desire was to: “...know him and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being conformed to His death;” (Philippians 3:10).  

Our purpose in life is to glorify God and enjoy fellowship with Him. Because of the fall of man, fellowship with God has been broken and man struggles to find peace and joy. Only through faith in Jesus Christ, can purpose in life be discovered. To exalt God is to fear and obey Him while keeping our hearts fixed on our future home, heaven. His purpose for our lives enables us to experience true and lasting joy–––the abundant life He desires for every believer. “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly” (John 10:10).



Lord, may my greatest achievement in life be to trust You and love You with all my heart.

Friday, September 21, 2018

No Confidence in the Flesh

No Confidence in the Flesh
Philippians 3:2-11 
Beware of the dogs, beware of the evil workers, beware of the false circumcision; for we are the true circumcision, who worship in the Spirit of God and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh...

Paul encourages the Philippians to worship God and have no confidence in their flesh. He gives a religious rundown of his attributes prior to salvation and refers to himself as being a righteous man, “blameless,” which was, useless or rubbish, compared to the surpassing value of knowing Jesus Christ. To know Christ was not an intellectual knowledge but it was to know Him through the experience of faith, “For God, who said, ‘Light shall shine out of darkness,’ is the One who has shone in our hearts to give the Light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ” (2 Corinthians 4:6). In trusting Christ, Paul was turning his back on Judaism and Phariseeism and then he literally, “suffered the loss of all things,” to gain Christ.

Paul desired a sincere personal intimacy and deeper knowledge of Christ. He realized the Supreme power of His resurrection, and the intense sufferings Christ had experienced. Paul was willing to suffer loss for the cause of Christ exchanging death for life while expressing and demonstrating a passion for the Gospel to those who were lost.

Are you resting in the hope of your salvation in a past event or in the power of the Gospel to convert sinners? Is your confidence in yourself because you think you are a good person? “All have sinned, and come (fall) short of the glory of God”(Romans 3:23). Does your life show distinct signs of a transformed life or are you living a false or dead faith (James 2:14-26)?  I pray that you truly know Christ and are living the Christian life by faith so that others may see the light of Christ and bring glory to His name.


Lord, may I put my confidence only in You.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Dwelling in the Secret Place of God

Dwelling in the Secret Place of God
Psalm 91:1-2,14-16 KJV


He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. . . He is my refuge and my fortress: my God; in him will I trust. Because he hath set his love upon me, therefore will I deliver him: I will set him on high, because he hath known my name. He shall call upon me, and I will answer him: I will be with him in trouble; I will deliver him, and honour him. With long life will I satisfy him, and shew him my salvation.

What does Psalm 91:1 mean, “He that dwelleth in the secret place of the Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty?” The Word of God says we are to abide in Christ (John 15). To abide means to be in a state of spiritual rest, regardless of outward circumstances. How near do we have to be in order for His shadow to fall upon us? As we draw closer in our relationship to Christ, we grow nearer to His shadow which is a metaphor speaking of His provision and cherished promises.

God promises He will answer our prayers and comfort us in times of difficulty. He promises to remain with us and protect us when we are troubled. Can anyone claim these treasured promises? No! They are promises only to those who “know my name” and love Him (Psalm 91:14). A personal relationship with Christ is required to have such special promises. We do not have to leave our responsibilities, or our relationships to dwell in the secret place.

Are you dwelling in the secret place of the Most High and do you abide beneath the shadow of the Almighty? The Most High God is Elohim, the true God of absolute authority and supremacy. To abide under the shadow of the Almighty is to be in the presence of El Shaddai, the ever-existent One, the One mighty to nourish, supply and satisfy.

Lord, I’m blessed to know Your name.


Friday, September 7, 2018

A Spiritual War

A Spiritual War 
2 Corinthians 10:4,5
For the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh, but divinely powerful for the destruction of fortresses. We are destroying speculations and every lofty thing raised up against the knowledge of God, and we are taking every thought captive to the obedience of Christ,

In 2 Corinthians 10:4, the Bible speaks of fortresses or spiritual strongholds which hold people captive by the forces of evil. How can one dispel the satanic assaults that the prince of darkness promotes? Can a person demolish the influences of the evil one and defeat falsehood? Only by the Gospel, can one be rescued from the lies and deceptions of hell (2 Corinthians 4:3,4). 

Wrong philosophies, false teachings, and those that oppose the Word of God are the enemies of Christ. They are fortresses that seal off the mind, damage good reasoning, and assault one’s purpose in life. If we allow ourselves to be taken in by deceptive doctrines and distorted theories, we will find ourselves in a battle called, spiritual warfare. 

Be careful what you allow to influence your mind through books, articles, internet, etc. As a Christian, you should seek to keep your heart pure through the reading of God’s Word and sound teaching. To permit untrue ideas into your mind is dangerous and threatens your ability to view God correctly. “See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits of the world, and not according to Christ” (Colossians 2:8). When the world tries to say, “There Is No God,” beware!

We are not instructed to fight demons or wage an attack on Satan himself, according to the New Testament, but we are called to dispute error with truth. Only the truth of God’s Word can conquer the fortresses that hold people captive, shattering the chains of sin and making them free  for eternity (John 3:36; 8:36-40).


Lord, may the influences in my life, help me to spread the Gospel of Christ.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Satan, Our Enemy

Satan, Our Enemy
Ephesians 2:1-3

And you were dead in your trespasses and sins, in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit that is now working in the sons of disobedience...
James 4:4 
You adulteresses, do you not know that friendship with the world is hostility toward God? Therefore whoever wishes to be a friend of the world makes himself an enemy of God.

When attempting to work with women in addiction, one can see how hard Satan works to deceive, destroy and kill those that have been captured by his lies. My heart was moved as I entered a courtroom a while ago to see twenty to thirty men and women restrained by chains around their wrists and ankles. As they shuffled across the crowded room to their seats, their faces were unresponsive. They were then ordered not to have eye contact with anyone seated in the courtroom. While listening to the charges brought against them and then having the question posed,  “How do you plea?” the answer, “guilty” was quite overwhelming!

What a picture of the ugly chains of sin mankind has been shackled with throughout human history. A man has no hope without believing in the truth of the gospel; that Jesus did for them what they could never do for themselves. Satan has bound them with his lies and will utterly destroy them unless they believe in Christ and trust Him by faith (John 3:36). 

If you are struggling with the chains of sin my friend, trust Christ today. Repent of your sins and put your faith and trust in what Jesus did for you on the cross. The gospel of Christ is the truth that will set you free from the bondage of sin, and He is the only One who can promise eternal life to all who believe.  (John 6:47) “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who believes has eternal life.”


Lord, I put my faith and trust in You.

Friday, August 24, 2018

Can We Forget Our Salvation?

Can We Forget Our Salvation?

2 Peter 1:5-11 KJV
And beside this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge; And to knowledge temperance; and to temperance patience; and to patience godliness; And to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity... But he that lacketh these things is blind, and cannot see afar off, and hath forgotten that he was purged from his old sins...

Peter wants us to remember the reality of our salvation. He is saying that our salvation is abundant and everlasting. To know the richness of our salvation is to understand who we are in Christ and what we possess in Him. "According as His divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness through the knowledge of Him that hath called us to glory and virtue by which are given unto us exceedingly great and precious promises that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, . . .” (2 Peter 1:3,4). 

Saving faith redeems you, sustains you, and gives you all you need in Christ. When you became a believer, you instantly possessed all things that pertained to life and godliness. All of God is in Christ and all of Christ is in you. You can rest in the gospel and righteousness of God making sure of your standing in Christ. Even though you sin, the gospel will encourage you with unrelenting grace towards you.

Living a virtuous and excellent life fulfills the highest potential of God in man. Living a life that controls passions adds to your life of faith the excellence of Christ's likeness. We are to portray a life of wisdom, goodness, knowledge and brotherly affection, with genuine love. The riches of your salvation has given to you a hungering and thirsting for the knowledge of Christ.  It will make sure your calling, your salvation, and if you practice these qualities, you will not stumble into doubt, questioning your salvation.


Lord, if I live out the gospel knowing the precious promise of eternal life is from You, my life is enriched.