Friday, June 29, 2018

Thank You for Freedom


Thank You for Freedom

Galatians 5:1 KJV
 Stand fast therefore in the liberty (freedom) wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage (slavery).

There is no greater feeling of liberation than to experience the freedom from sin and death that You, Father, have provided through Christ Jesus. Today my voice and my heart are free to praise You for this, and I am immensely grateful. Forty-five years ago, I was “Born Again” by the Spirit of God working in my life. This was the first truly free Fourth of July celebration I had ever experienced and I will forever be thankful.

On this Independence Day, I am reminded of all those who have sacrificed for my freedom, following the example of Your Son, Jesus Christ. Let me never take my freedom for granted, physically or spiritually. May I call to mind my freedom was purchased with an immeasurable worth, others’ lives. Thank you, Father, for giving the ultimate sacrifice, Your perfect sinless Son, for a sinner like me.

I want to express my sincere appreciation to my God for allowing me the awesome opportunity of being an American and for the wonderful life Christ has given me. I am free from the bondage of sin according to Galatians 5:1, and privileged to live in the land of the free. Though the men and women that have given their lives for freedom’s sake were not my personal friends, I am thankful for their extreme sacrifice, and love of liberty. The sacrificial death of Christ upon the cross was an expression of Jesus’ love for me and evidence of His selfless mercy and infinite grace He has freely given. 

 ~ Famous Quote ~

On God's side ~ "My concern is not whether God is on our side; my greatest concern is to be on God's side." — Abraham Lincoln


Lord, bless those who continue to give their lives for my freedom and grant me the opportunity to lead others to true freedom that can only be found in knowing You through the Gospel of Christ by faith.

Friday, June 22, 2018

Walking in Fellowship with the Father

Walking in Fellowship with the Father
Ephesians 5:1,2,8,15,16 

Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God . . . Walk as children of light.

If we are the children of God, then we ought to fellowship with the Father. We are to walk as children of light, in wisdom and purity. The word “followers” in verse 1 of the King James Bible is the word mimics so that we may say, “Be ye therefore imitators of God, as dear children.”  Paul gave several purposes why we should walk in fellowship with the Father.

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father in love. Walking with God and in fellowship with Him, teaches us to love Him and others as He loves. Without His abundant love abounding in our hearts, we cannot truly love others as we are commanded to do.

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father as children of light. Since we are to imitate the Father, then we should walk in the light having nothing to do with the darkness of sin. It is beneath the dignity of a saint of God to indulge in the sins which Paul names in Ephesians 5:3,4. Walking in fellowship with the Father is walking in the light of the Word of God, “called out of darkness into His marvelous light” (I Peter 2:9).

We are to walk in fellowship with the Father in wisdom. See that you walk carefully, circumspectly, with guidance from the Word of God. The word circumspectly comes from two Latin words which mean, “looking around.” Only a fool drifts with the wind and the tide but a person that walks in the fellowship of the Father walks in the knowledge and understanding of God’s word. 

To fellowship with the Father is to follow Him as imitators of Christ that He may transform our minds through His glorious Truth.


Lord, may I walk wisely in the fellowship of Your marvelous light and love.

Friday, June 15, 2018

I've Sinned, What Now?

I’ve Sinned, What Now?

Psalm 51:3-4  KJV
For I acknowledge my transgressions: and my sin is ever before me. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight. . .”

When David was confronted with his transgressions, he realized that his sin was against God and prayed a prayer of repentance taking full responsibility for what he had done. As a Christian, you will war with Satan in his efforts to undermine you. But, a believer has already been provided a way of escape according to (I Corinthians 10:13)Although your offenses against God may seem as though they will require some desperate measures, you do have hope “through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 7:25; Hebrews 4:15,16). Because of His unchanging, and matchless, character, Christ’s infinite grace has forgiven all your sins.

Some Christians assume that certain sins cannot be forgiven or that they are too far gone to be helped. Such unbelief breeds disobedience and despair. We as Christians need to remember that the teaching of the New Testament is “With God nothing shall be impossible” (Luke 1:37)A faithful God does not expect us to do what we cannot; He supplies the strength we need (Philippians 4:13).  Paul, in essence, was saying, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness” (2 Corinthians 12:9).  “He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might He increases strength. They who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint” (Isaiah 40:29-31).

We can reflect on the reassuring words of Paul, who declares, “. . . in whom we trust that he will yet deliver us;” (2 Corinthians 12:9). “Delight thyself also in the LORD; and he shall give thee the desires of thine heart.  Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass” (Psalm 37:4,5).


Lord, Your grace is sufficient for me.

Friday, June 8, 2018

Life, When It Hurts

Life, When It Hurts
Galatians 6:2 
Bear one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

What does it mean to fulfill the law of Christ? Most Bible teachers say that the law of Christ is what Jesus stated in Mark 12:28-31, “. . . love the Lord your God with all your heart . . . soul . . . mind and . . . strength.’  . . . ‘love your neighbor as yourself.’  There is no other commandment greater than these.”

Are there things that you wish others knew and could understand when life brings real heart-wrenching pain and your grief overpowers every dream you hold dear?  Sometimes people with good intentions say foolish and harmful things to those suffering. Words can wound an already broken heart to the point of devastation instead of giving hope and strength in an ongoing crisis.

Someone in sorrow needs for you to come alongside and give them encouragement through a touch of compassion, and a tearful, tender heart (Romans 12:15). Even though the question, “How are you doing?” seems like the right thing to ask, it can seem to the wounded and distressed that they need to give a report of their actions, thoughts, or emotions. There’s not a time limit on grieving and people from all walks of life suffer differently. 

Expressing an impatient attitude towards a hurting person is jarring to the senses. It can cause despondency; the loss of hope, and despair; the feeling that no favorable outcome will ever exist.  Be thoughtful in quoting Scripture such as Romans 8:28, most likely, things are not good for them right now, nor does it seem like there will ever be anything positive come out of their circumstances. 

Helping someone who is in deep sorrow to recognize the sovereignty of God in death is what they need most. Knowing that He is in absolute authority over all things brings peace and reminds them to “be still” and rest in the knowledge that God is their Refuge and Comforter, always (Psalms 46:10; 91:1,2; John 14:16).


Lord, may I fulfill the law of Christ, bearing another’s burden.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs

Love Keeps No Record of Wrongs 
1 Corinthians 13:4,5 
Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil;

Throughout the Word of God, accounting terms are used to describe the forgiving work of Christ. When you were saved He did not impute, count, reckon, or consider your sins against you.  “How blessed is the man to whom the LORD does not impute iniquity. . .” (Psalm 32:2).  The pardoning work of God doesn’t credit or assign sin to you. It doesn’t produce long-term resentment but rather, it produces love and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding (Philippians 4:7).

In I Corinthians 13, Paul is showing the model for love. Love doesn’t hold others accountable for wrong deeds or keep any kind of record. It doesn’t recite all the sinful things done because love never makes memories out of offenses. It never rehearses the injustices executed until they’re so embedded that you can’t live your life in freedom. Love is unable to do this.

To think no evil (I Corinthians 13:5 KJV) means we don’t take into account a wrong or evil we have suffered at the hands of someone or hold it against them indefinitely. While suffering on the cross, Jesus spoke these words, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34). Holding no grudges and keeping no record of wrong is what Paul is trying to encourage believers to do.

“. . . Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Christ and. . . God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them” (I Corinthians 5:17-19).  As God has forgiven us and does not count our sins against us, we too, are to forgive and be reconciled to those who have sinned against us.


Lord, thank You for the love that reconciles sinners to God and keeps no record of wrongs.