Friday, July 26, 2019

Depression, Is It Sin?

Depression, Is It Sin?

Is depression sin? Are there reasons for depression that we aren’t aware of and yet we believe it’s sin? Can we detour the unfortunate situations in our lives that cause depression or are they out of our control? Job suffered circumstances that overwhelmed him and physically impaired him. Was he in sin?  If someone suffers from a health issue that is debilitating and becomes depressed due to medication, are they in sin? Do we try to understand what a person is going through and with love and compassion walk with them in their path of depression and pain?

If a person that is suffering from depression is a Christian, we may find Gal 6:2 an important  Scripture to read and obey. “Bear one another's burdens . . .” The death of a loved one or illnesses that are irreversible can cause depression. Accidents leaving a person disabled can cause a person to become depressed. Some people don’t recognize their depression because they’ve blocked it out of their mind. Why? People have been taught that depression is a sin. Not all depression is caused by unconfessed sin. Most depression is from physical or emotional atrocities which have had devastating effects.

Sometimes, we believe that Christians are free from all despairing situations but this is not true. We are fallen men and women and sometimes we simply struggle with life. We live in sin scarred bodies and in a sin-cursed world. Depression is not caused solely by our sinning, but because of life itself. If a person has not dealt with their sin, they can suffer from depression. But, to say that all people suffering from depression are in sin is damaging. The Apostle Paul said, “we despaired of life itself” (2 Corinthians 1:8).  In 2 Corinthians 12:9, Christ said, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Paul’s reply, “Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me.” 


Lord, may I have compassion on those who are in depression. 

Friday, July 19, 2019

A Heart of Bitterness

 A Heart of Bitterness
Ruth 1:19-20 
So they both went until they came to Bethlehem. And when they had come to Bethlehem, all the city was stirred because of them, and the women said, “Is this Naomi?” She said to them, “Do not call me Naomi; call me Mara, for the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me.”

As Naomi enters Bethlehem, with Ruth by Naomi’s side, the people of the city begin to move about asking, “Is this Naomi?” Ten years have gone by since Naomi lived there, and they didn’t know the overwhelming effect that bitterness had produced in her heart. To those standing near, Naomi bitterly replied, “Don’t call me Naomi, which means, pleasant, but call me Mara, meaning, bitter, for the LORD has brought me home to Bethlehem empty.”

Satan wanted Naomi to focus on the negative, those areas of weakness where unforgiveness, anger, feelings of bitterness lived and would breed discouragement. She couldn’t think clearly when she focused on the lies of Satan. His lies divided her mind and caused her to shift the blame to God and of course, to others. Naomi’s bitterness was an attitude of deep discontentment that poisoned her soul and destroyed her peace. A sour Christian is one of Satan's greatest trophies and why the Bible says, "See to it…that no root of bitterness springing up causes trouble, and by it many be defiled” (Hebrews 12:15). If we continue to live in bitterness, this harmful condition will eventually be passed on to others causing immense negative effects. 

How do you handle bitterness? Do you confess your bitterness to God, and seek His forgiveness and help? “Yes!” Christ took upon Himself every sin you ever committed—including your bitterness when He died on the cross. Whatever the cause, commit your bitterness to God, crucifying the flesh with its passions and desires. Through faith in Christ, walk by the Spirit not gratifying the lust of the flesh (Galatians 5:16). 


Lord, forgive my bitterness and fill my heart with the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5).

Friday, July 12, 2019

"Thy Will Be Done"

“Thy Will Be Done”
Matthew 6:9-10 KJV

After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. 
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. 



Our Lord instructed His disciples on prayer and gave them an example to follow not as a magical formula, but to commune with God. This prayer is short and to the point never mentioning the time of day in which to pray, how long to pray, or the position in which one is to pray. But, we are instructed to, “Pray without ceasing” (I Thessalonians 5:17). Prayer usually comes from a heart which is truly committed to Christ generating thankfulness for all He has done. 

Prayer demonstrates our faith and trust in God in discerning His will for our lives. There are some who are fearful of God’s plan. The thought of surrendering to His will is overwhelming and at times even terrifying. These dear people are sure that if they were to yield to God, they would suffer painful, uncertain times in some distant and dangerous place. They can imagine themselves wasting away in solitude while being miserable in their existence. Psalm 33:11 says, “The counsel (plan) of the LORD standeth (endures, stands firm) for ever, the thoughts (intentions) of his heart to all generations.” 

They must understand that the plan or will of God comes from an expression of His heart. I John 4:18 says, “There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love.” The will of God works in our lives to bring about His highest goal, glorifying Him through His unchangeable love for us. Our prayer should be that God, by His grace, would transform us making us willing and able to know and obey His will. And may we ever be mindful, that God designs His will, from His heart.


Lord, I pray “Thy will be done” in my life, to bring glory to Your name.

Friday, July 5, 2019

I'm Troubled, but Not in Despair

I’m Troubled, but Not in Despair
Psalm 143:4,8,10 
Therefore my spirit is overwhelmed within me; My heart is appalled (greatly dismayed) within me... Let me hear Your lovingkindness in the morning; For I trust in You... Teach me the way in which I should walk; For to You I lift up my soul; Teach me to do Your will, For You are my God;

David was seeking God for deliverance in a time of a great trial. For us to know that through God’s faithfulness we are guarded on every side and that He will guide us through our times of trouble is a refuge to us. Sometimes, our “feelings” get in the way and we are “overwhelmed” within. David wrote; “Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you in turmoil within me? (Psalm 42:11). Our feelings can sometimes govern our ability to think right and we lose sight of what God is doing in and through us. 

David asked for forgiveness and was seeking God’s mercy and deliverance from his many enemies. With troubled feelings, he pleaded for the light of God’s countenance to shine upon him and for God to give him wisdom and understanding. As Christians, we too should be seeking God, asking for His mercy to deliver us from those whose aim is to hurt and ruin us. In the New Testament, Paul wrote, “We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair”; (2 Corinthians 4:8). Paul, like David, was showing that in the conflict of soul and endless suffering, he was not crippled or cast down, but strengthened through Christ (2 Corinthians 12:9). 

Maybe, it’s not an enemy that seeks to cause pain, but a friend or a loved one that has brought despair and heartache. This can cause tremendous suffering, agony, and torment to the soul. Ask God to teach you how you should walk through this time of distress and trust Him to do His will in you. 


Lord, I trust You with my troubled soul.